4 Posts about
Eyetracking

Taking centre stage: research finds that preferences for artworks depends on location and where people look last

The preference for works of art or even consumer items is often thought to remain in the eye of the beholder – eyetracking research suggests a correlation between the amount a person looks at an object and their preference for it.


Bunnyfoot’s new bigger, better London office and labs!

Thanks to the continued success of our Westbourne Studios office, we are moving on to something bigger and better. We’ve outgrown the space at Westbourne so need more, better testing labs and more consultant desks.

For months we’ve been on the lookout for the perfect location and we found it at St John’s House in Farringdon.

Bunnyfoot's new London office

Bunnyfoot’s new London office from the outside


The Great Eyetracking Debate

May 12, 2009
Posted by in Events
Tags: , ,

Following on From Robert Stevens talk at the Usability Professionals Association in Hong Kong on ‘Why You Need Eyetracking’ he will be talking about the same hot topic, but this time in the form of a debate UK UPA, 20th May 2009.


Eyetracking – the basics of how it works

I am often asked how the eyetrackers work (second only to why the name Bunnyfoot?) – so here it is – in essence it is really simple – a digital camera videos your pupils (the holes that let light into your eye) and a computer works out where you are looking based on the video images.

Well there is a little bit more to it than that (not much though):
Tobii eyetrackers contain infra-red emitting diodes and a high resolution digital camera
The infrared diodes shine light on the person in front of the eyetracker (it’s 14 times less strong than that emitted from a TV remote – so doesn’t burn their eyes out).


Read enough? Get in touch...

Contact Clare Lambert to discuss your needs:
0207 608 1670 more@bunnyfoot.com

Or come visit us, we have offices in Oxford, Sheffield and London.