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Brain bites: 2 min insights

Bunnyfoot talks ‘Inclusive by default’ at the University of West London

Last week we visited the University of West London to give a talk about being ‘inclusive by default’. Having worked extensively in this area for many of the UK’s biggest companies, we wanted to inspire undergraduate computer science and design students to make sure their future products include participants with access needs as a part of their standard research sample.


Top tips for running Accessibility Testing

March 9, 2017
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There are around 12 million of us with disabilities in the UK, amounting to 19% of the population. With almost 1 in 5 people having access needs and the majority of them having acquired their disability later in life (Disability facts and figures, 2016), you would think that all products are designed with accessibility in mind. But this is far from reality.


Why you should design and audit services holistically

February 17, 2017
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In both theatre and service design, everything that is happening off-stage has an impact on what is happening on-stage and on the customer’s overall experience. It is therefore key to design and audit services holistically to understand how everything works together and identify the issues and opportunities.


Service Design for Changing Needs

We’re all familiar with Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, but have you ever considered the breadth of different human needs within each of these categories? User needs can be vast and unexpected!


5 tips for creating positive, share-worthy service experiences

January 19, 2017
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In a recent study, we found that people are just as likely to share a positive experience (48%) with your service as a negative one (51%) when looking across all channels.

So it’s clear that providing a positive service experience encourages people to share it, whether that’s in conversation with family/friends/colleagues on social media channels (i.e. Facebook, Twitter) or writing a review or email.


The Pros and Cons of conducting Usability Testing with multiple participants at the same time

Our lead Usability Testing course trainer Cathy Carr recently encountered an interesting question from one of her attendees: ‘Would you ever test with more than one participants in a single session?’. The short answer is ‘yes’. Surprised?


Practical Empathy: A valuable method for idea generation

October 28, 2016
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As UX experts, we often come across projects where we are asked to evaluate an existing idea or design. For these projects we check whether the product or service works well for the customers, perhaps through an evaluation or usability testing.


Why test your product in the ‘context of use’?

September 27, 2016
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Firstly, what is the ‘context of use’?

It’s an obvious thing to say but people don’t live in a vacuum; they’re subject to all sorts of influences which can affect their experience of using products.

These influences can come from a variety of sources, e.g.:

  • The physical environment (e.g. ambient temperature and light levels)
  • Social settings (e.g. are they working alone or in a team? What are the social norms?)
  • The technical environment (e.g. is WiFi available?)
  • Commercial and legal requirements (e.g. what procedures have to be followed?)

All of the things that affect someone’s usage of a product can be defined as the ‘context of use’.


Want to design an exceptional customer experience? Spice it up with emotion, advises Senior Interaction Designer, Jon Dixon

September 16, 2016
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Adding emotion into the customer experience will talk to people’s unconscious brain, the more primitive parts of the brain that are in charge of making decisions.

Jon says: “It really surprises our clients to learn that most of the decisions we make, big or small, are largely made by the unconscious brain rather than the conscious brain.


10 tips on writing crisp clear content

Do you ever need to write step-by-step instructions on how to do something? Are you struggling to write error messages that accurately describe the error and how to fix it?

Clear, well-structured content makes for a good user experience. If content’s badly written or badly structured, it lets down your design and the user experience suffers. People won’t be able to do what they came to your site to do.

Writing clearly is something we can all do – if we focus on what the audience needs or wants (the ‘user need’). Here are 10 tips to help you focus.


Read enough? Get in touch...

Contact Clare Lambert to discuss your needs:
0207 608 1670 more@bunnyfoot.com

Or come visit us, we have offices in Oxford, Sheffield and London.